Refrain

Dreams by Langston Hughes

Hold fast to dreams
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird
That cannot fly.
Hold fast to dreams
For when dreams go
Life is a barren field
Frozen with snow.

[retrieved from http://www.holmdelschools.org/schools/satz/eng_dept/Writing%20styles/Poetry/Exemplars/poem_with_a_refrain.htm]

James Mercer Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 – May 22, 1967) was an American poet, social activist, novelist,playwright, and columnist. First published in The Crisis in 1921, “The Negro Speaks of Rivers”, which became Hughes’s signature poem, was collected in his first book of poetry The Weary Blues (1926). Hughes’s first and last published poems appeared in The Crisis; more of his poems were published in The Crisis than in any other journal. Hughes’s life and work were enormously influential during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, alongside those of his contemporaries, Zora Neale HurstonWallace ThurmanClaude McKayCountee CullenRichard Bruce Nugent, and Aaron Douglas. Except for McKay, they worked together also to create the short-lived magazine Fire!! Devoted to Younger Negro Artists. On May 22, 1967, Hughes died from complications after abdominal surgery, related to prostate cancer, at the age of 65.

[retrieved from http://www.wikipedia.org]

Definition: A refrain is the line or lines that are repeated in music or in verse; the “chorus” of a song.

[retrieved from http://www.wikipedia.org]

The poem is saying that no matter what, never let go of your dreams for you will have a lonely life. This poem demonstrates the use of a refrain because the first line is repeated.

Unknown-1

I chose a picture of a chorus because chorus’ always sing the refrains of songs.

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