Couplet

Sick by Shel Silverstein

"I cannot go to school today,"
Said little Peggy Ann McKay.
"I have the measles and the mumps,
A gash, a rash and purple bumps.
My mouth is wet, my throat is dry,
I'm going blind in my right eye.
My tonsils are as big as rocks,
I've counted sixteen chicken pox
And there's one more--that's seventeen,
And don't you think my face looks green?
My leg is cut--my eyes are blue--
It might be instamatic flu.
I cough and sneeze and gasp and choke,
I'm sure that my left leg is broke--
My hip hurts when I move my chin,
My belly button's caving in,
My back is wrenched, my ankle's sprained,
My 'pendix pains each time it rains.
My nose is cold, my toes are numb.
I have a sliver in my thumb.
My neck is stiff, my voice is weak,
I hardly whisper when I speak.
My tongue is filling up my mouth,
I think my hair is falling out.
My elbow's bent, my spine ain't straight,
My temperature is one-o-eight.
My brain is shrunk, I cannot hear,
There is a hole inside my ear.
I have a hangnail, and my heart is--what?
What's that? What's that you say?
You say today is. . .Saturday?
G'bye, I'm going out to play!"


[retrieved from http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/16480#sthash.m5e4r5Dz.dpuf]

Sheldon Allan “Shel” Silverstein (September 25, 1930 – May 10, 1999), was an American poetsinger-songwritercartoonistscreenwriter, and author of children’s books. Shel Silverstein was born into a Jewish family. He attended Roosevelt High School and, later, the University of Illinois, from which he was expelled. He then attended Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and Roosevelt University for three years, until 1953 when he was drafted into the United States Army. He served in Japan and Korea.  On May 10, 1999, Silverstein died at age 68 of a massive heart attack in Key West.

[retrieved from http://www.wikipedia.org]

Definition: A couplet is a pair of lines of meter in poetry. Couplets usually consist of two lines that rhyme and have the same meter. A couplet may be formal (closed) or run-on (open). In a formal (or closed) couplet, each of the two lines is end-stopped, meaning that there is a grammatical pause at the end of a line of verse. In a run-on (or open) couplet, the meaning of the first line continues into the second.

[retrieved from http://www.wikipedia.org]

The poem follows Peggy Ann McKay who pretends to be sick, because she doesn’t want to go to school. In the end of the poem, she magically heals since it’s Saturday and she wants to play. This poem demonstrates the use of couplets because every pair of lines starting from the top rhyme.

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I chose this picture of a couple holding hands to represent the rhyme in every couple lines.

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