Alliteration

Betty Botter by Mother Goose

Betty Botter bought some butter, but, she said, the butter’s bitter; if I put it in my batter it will make my batter bitter, but a bit of better butter will make my batter better.

So she bought a bit of butter better than her bitter butter, and she put it in her batter and the batter was not bitter. So ’twas better Betty Botter bought a bit of better butter.

[retrieved from http://examples.yourdictionary.com/examples-of-alliteration-poems.html]

The figure of Mother Goose is an imaginary author of a collection of fairy tales and nursery rhymes[1] often published asMother Goose Rhymes.Despite evidence to the contrary,[8] there are doubtful reports, familiar to tourists to Boston, Massachusetts, that the original Mother Goose was a Bostonian wife of an Isaac Goose, either named Elizabeth Foster Goose (1665–1758) or Mary Goose (d. 1690, age 42) who is interred at the Granary Burying Ground on Tremont Street. According to Eleanor Early, a Boston travel and history writer of the 1930s and ’40s, the original Mother Goose was a real person who lived in Boston in the 1660s. She was reportedly the second wife of Isaac Goose (alternatively named Vergoose or Vertigoose), who brought to the marriage six children of her own to add to Isaac’s ten. After Isaac died, Elizabeth went to live with her eldest daughter, who had married Thomas Fleet, a publisher who lived on Pudding Lane (now Devonshire Street). According to Early, “Mother Goose” used to sing songs and ditties to her grandchildren all day, and other children swarmed to hear them. Finally, her son-in-law gathered her jingles together and printed them.

[retrieved from http://www.wikipedia.org]

Definition: An alliteration is the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words.

In the poem, Better Botter has bought bitter butter which makes her batter bitter. So, she buys better butter so the batter is no longer bitter. This poem demonstrates the use of alliteration, because of the repeated ‘b’ sound.

bittergourd

I chose this picture of a bitter gourd to represent the bitter batter in the poem.

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