Acrostic

An Acrostic by Edgar Allan Poe

Elizabeth it is in vain you say
“Love not” — thou sayest it in so sweet a way:
In vain those words from thee or L.E.L.
Zantippe’s talents had enforced so well:
Ah! if that language from thy heart arise,
Breath it less gently forth — and veil thine eyes.
Endymion, recollect, when Luna tried
To cure his love — was cured of all beside —
His follie — pride — and passion — for he died.


– See more at: https://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/22529#sthash.AY8jaTnK.dpuf%5Bretrieved from http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/22529#sthash.woH8uXUd.dpuf]

Edgar Allan Poe (born Edgar Poe; January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American author, poet, editor, and literary critic, considered part of the American Romantic Movement. Best known for his tales of mystery and the macabre. Poe and his works influenced literature in the United States and around the world, as well as in specialized fields, such as cosmology and cryptography. Poe and his work appear throughout popular culture in literature, music, films, and television. A number of his homes are dedicated museums today. The Mystery Writers of America present an annual award known as the Edgar Award for distinguished work in the mystery genre.

[retrieved from http://www.wikipedia.org]

Acrostic

Definition:An acrostic is a poem or other form of writing in which the first letter, syllable or word of each line, paragraph or other recurring feature in the text spells out a word or a message.This acrostic, written by Edgar Allan Poe, spells out ‘Elizabeth’ and was written for his cousin Elizabeth. The poem is quite confusing, and considering that it was never published, it was most likely only meaningful to Poe himself. I think the poem discusses the characteristics of Elizabeth and comparisons are made to Socrates wife.Xanthippe

I chose this picture of Xanthippe, Socrates’s wife because she is referenced in the poem.

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